Is ABA Meeting Its Responsibilities to Adults with ASD?

Is ABA Meeting Its Responsibilities to Adults with ASD?
Peter Gerhardt, Ph.D.
Epic School
Saturday, July 15th, 2017, 10:30am - 11:50am

Despite an emphasis on evidence-based intervention in ASD, adult outcomes remain poor “for almost any outcome you choose.” (Roux, et al, 2015, p. 8).  While there are certainly several reasons for continued poor outcomes many of them, as behavior analysts are well within the limits of our technology to change. As Baer, Wolf and Risley (1968) argued, competently applied behavior analytic interventions should result in strong, socially important, and generalizable outcomes which, subsequently, would from the basis for positive outcomes for adults with ASD.  This workshop will discuss ways to, potentially, address this “outcome-deficit” via a better understand of linkages between skills acquired in preschool to those required in adulthood and issues related to translating effective behavior analytic intervention from the clinic or classroom to the community at large.

After attending this presentation, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss the differences between evidence-based intervention and evidence-based practice with older individuals with ASD.
  • Identify a minimum of three potential solutions to the continued challenge of poor adult outcomes.
  • Discuss the importance of understanding the application of Behavior Analytic Intervention beyond what is generally associated with autism intervention.  

Session Materials

Peter Gerhardt, Ph.D.

Dr. Gerhardt has more than 30 years experience utilizing the principles of Applied Behavior Analysis in support of individuals with autism spectrum disorders in educational, employment, residential and community-based settings. Dr. Gerhardt is the author or the coauthor of many articles and book chapters on the needs of adolescents and adults with ASDs and has presented nationally and internationally on this topic. Dr. Gerhardt is the founding chair of the Scientific Council for the Organization for Autism Research (OAR) and currently sits on numerous professional advisory boards including Behavior Analysis in Practice, the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, the Association of Professional Behavior Analysts, and the Autism Society of America.  He received his doctorate from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Graduate School of Education.