Critical Issues in Teaching Play to Young Children with Disabilities

Critical Issues in Teaching Play to Young Children with Disabilities
Erin Barton, Ph.D., BCBA-D
Vanderbilt University
Friday, July 14th, 2017, 9:00am - 10:20am
1.5 BACB Type II CEUs (included in the price of registration)

Play provides an authentic context for learning and assessing skills across domains; however, children have to know how to play before the context can be used as such, to which an integration of perspectives contributes. Intervention studies highlight the importance of identifying both evidence-based intervention practices and evidence-based implementation practices that are doable, sustainable, and feasible at scale. A series of single case research studies will be described that examined practices for increasing the acquisition, maintenance, and generalization of pretend play behaviors in children with disabilities. Results will be discussed in terms of using individual characteristics to identify evidence-based practices focused on teaching play. 

Learning Objectives: 

  • Participants will describe current issues with the play intervention research. 
  • Participants will identify different types of play and appropriate play goals. 
  • Participants will list several effective practices for increasing play skills in children with disabilities. 

Erin Barton, Ph.D., BCBA-D

Erin Barton is an Associate Professor in the Department of Special Education. Her primary line of inquiry focuses on identifying evidence-based behavioral interventions that teachers and parents can implement in natural and inclusive settings. Dr. Barton has conducted several studies examining effective practices for increasing play skills in young children and is currently refining the intervention package and examining implementation features. She also examines best practices for using performance-based feedback to increase early childhood professionals’ use of recommended practices. She teaches courses in single case research design, assessment, social and behavioral interventions, and working with children with multiple and severe disabilities. Dr. Barton also serves on multiple editorial boards and is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Early Intervention. She is on the Executive Board of the Division for Early Childhood of the Council for Exceptional Children and currently serves as the board president. Dr. Barton is a faculty member in the Early Childhood Special Education and Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) programs.